Freedom Debt Relief Reviews: How Does it Work? Is it Legit?

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Freedom Debt Relief Reviews: DATOS

Freedom Debt Relief: If you are dealing with money problems and cannot pay your debts, hang on. I’ll tell you all about Freedom Debt Relief Reviews: How it Works and if it is for real.

What People Say About Freedom Debt Relief

People who used Freedom Debt Relief are happy because it helped them lower their debts. More than 850,000 customers got rid of over $15 billion in debt with its help. If you want more details before choosing Freedom Debt Relief, keep reading.

To pay less than what you owe, Freedom Debt Relief talks to the people you owe money to and makes deals. They have different ways to help with debts, and they got an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau. If customers have issues and tell the BBB, Freedom always responds.

Freedom Debt Relief Review Overview

Name of the ArticleFreedom Debt Relief Reviews
Founded In2002
Purpose of the Company Helps in Settling Debts
Debt TypesUnsecured Debts
Minimum required debt $7,500.
FDR Rates21% of debt on an average
Time Taken2-4 years
Official Website of FDR https://www.freedomdebtrelief.com/

About Freedom Debt Relief

Freedom Debt Reduction started in Arizona in 2002 to help people reduce their debts. They make it possible for customers to pay less money by reducing the amount they owe. For more than 20 years, they have helped over 850,000 people pay back more than $15 billion in debt.

You can use Freedom Debt Relief to pay off credit cards, store cards, personal loans, and medical bills. However, remember, it only works for debts without collateral, like mortgages or auto loans. They cannot help with federal student loans either.

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How Freedom Debt Relief Works

To know more about how it works or if you can use Freedom Debt Relief to settle your debts, you can fill out a form online or call them. When you start, you will put money each month into a special savings account that’s protected by the FDIC, and it’s just for paying settlements.

Freedom Debt Relief talks to each of your qualifying creditors one by one to make deals. You have to agree to any deal they make with your creditors. The money you saved up is then used to pay your creditors once you approve the settlement agreement.

Freedom Debt Relief: Pros and Cons

Here, you can find the pros and cons of FDR.

Pros

  • Asks for less minimum debt than some others and gives legal advice too.
  • You can see how things are going and approve settlements through an online tool.
  • It might help you pay off your debt faster, and your monthly payments could be less than what you are paying now.
  • If the cost of settling your program is more than your total debt, Freedom Debt Relief gives you back the extra, up to all your expenses.

Cons

  • Your credit report shows you did not pay back the full loan amount for seven years.
  • If you want to end your subscription, you have to give written notice.
  • If you do not finish the plan, your financial situation can get worse because of fees, usually between 15% and 25% of the loan. On average, it is 21.5%.
  • While you are in the program, you might gather more interest, and your creditors do not have to agree to the plan.

We hope that looking at all the good and not-so-good things about FDR helps you decide if you want to go with them.

Is Freedom Debt Relief Trustworthy

Freedom Debt Relief is one of the largest companies in the US that helps people with financial problems. It is a respected company and a founding member of the American Fair Credit Council. It is also connected with the International Association of Professional Debt Arbitrators.

People have given it good ratings, like 4.5 out of 5 stars on Consumer Affairs and 4.46 out of 5 stars on BBB. However, some people complained about dishonesty and not handling payment plans well.

Before you sign up with FDR, think carefully about whether it is the right choice for you, as it works well for some but not for everyone.

People May Also Ask

Is Freedom Debt Relief a Legitimate Company?

Yes, Freedom Debt Relief is a real company. It is accredited by the Better Business Bureau and has the highest rating, A+. Customer reviews give it 4.3 out of 5 stars.

Does Freedom Debt Relief Give You Money?

No, Freedom Debt Relief does not give out loans itself. However, it can connect you with other companies that offer personal loans or home equity loans. They consider your unique money situation and suggest other options you might qualify for.

Is the Freedom Program Real?

Yes, the Freedom Debt Relief program is real. It is accredited by the American Fair Credit Council and the International Association of Professional Debt Arbitrators. In 2022, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau got 120 complaints about Freedom Debt Relief.

Does Freedom Debt Relief Hurt Your Credit?

Using Freedom Debt Relief may hurt your credit score initially. Like any debt settlement company, it can cause a drop in your credit score. The extent of the drop depends on your situation.

How Fast Does Freedom Debt Relief Work?

It takes a while. Negotiations with creditors can go on for months or even years. If you settle, you will make regular payments to Freedom Debt Relief for 24 to 48 months until all your accounts are clear.

Why is Debt Relief Considered Bad?

Debt relief can be risky. It hurts your credit score, has tax consequences, and may not fully solve your debt problem.

Is Using a Debt Relief Company Good?

It has risks. If the debt settlement company does not settle most of your debts, you might face debt collection lawsuits and end up paying fees that wipe out any savings they achieved.